Where stylish succulents meet great design: Inside Urban Spikes

Mar 25 2020

Around here, we have a little bit of a plant obsession. So when we discovered Urban Spikes' awesome collection of cacti and succulent designs planted in colorful sand, we knew we had to be friends. Founder Courtney Goldberg is equal parts artist, designer and green thumb. Her arrangements have contemporary vibes and a modern aesthetic, pairing sleek vessels with architectural succulents. For Market by Macy’s, we asked Courtney to put a whimsical spin on Urban Spikes' signature look, adding glitter to her sand art — a perfect match for our kid’s area, where a sequin wall and a bevy of neon Rockets of Awesome clothing make for a brighter-is-better statement. Here, we chat with the Dallas mom-turned-entrepreneur about Urban Spikes’ fast rise to plant fame.

Q.
In a snapshot, what is your day job like?
A.

I get dirty creating unique and thoughtful designs to complement our client’s spaces.

Q.
Where is home for you?
A.

A mid century modern ranch style home in Preston Hollow.

Q.
Where did the idea to launch Urban Spikes come from?
A.

I was two kids in and my husband and I had just moved into a very white, mid century modern, angular design home that needed warmth quickly. Budget-wise we had put the brakes on furniture and art, so I decided to build some terrariums and plants to add color to the space.

I discovered cut succulents and fell for their beautiful, easy and versatile nature. I never had a green thumb, so I was shocked to find a plant that could insert life into a space without the responsibility of having to care for it.

The business was born to bring warmth and dimension into a home without adding more responsibility to anyone’s plate. I was in PR for 10 years and never used my hands prior to Urban Spikes, so this was a dramatic career shift.

Q.
Three words to describe Urban Spikes?
A.

Inspired. Architectural. Fresh

Q.
One plant everyone should have in their home?
A.

Does it have to have roots? A cut succulent, of course.

Q.
Your succulents are super design-forward. Who are a few artists and designers that inspire you?
A.

Ashley Longshore, Donald Robertson, Katy Hirschfeld and Mike Hammer all attract my eye and inspire me in different ways.

Q.
Fun fact we can’t Google about you?
A.

I love dachshunds and there is way too much dachshund themed paraphernalia in my home and closet

Q.
Go-to places to eat, drink and hangout in Dallas?
A.

Alice. Beverley’s. And my house — I’m a homebody!

Q.
Can plants make us happy?
A.

It has been scientifically proven that having nature around us helps us focus, increases creativity, and helps us recover faster. As we care for plants, we feel needed. They can’t survive without our care.

Having plants is also a great way to teach responsibility to kids — and to anyone else. There are plenty of fun plant projects to do with kids or friends, such as propagating, repotting, floral arranging, kokedamas, and painting pots or making macramé hangers to hold plants.

Q.
Spring has sprung! Any tips from your garden gurus for helping us give our plants a little TLC?
A.

Clean: Shine those leaves and have your plant looking its finest. Not only do clean leaves mean that your plant looks pretty, but it also means they are able to photosynthesize better! Clean your plants a couple times a year with a damp rag or leaf shine to make sure dust isn’t keeping sunlight from getting to the leaves! You can buy basic leaf shine at any plant store or on Amazon.

Repot: If your plant has been in its current pot for more than two years, it might be time to transplant it so the roots can have more room to grow. Find a pot that is one to two inches larger than your current one! If you transplant your plant to a pot that is more than two inches bigger than the previous pot, the plant will spend all of its energy growing roots to fill the pot instead of spending time growing leaves!

Trim: Cut dead or damaged leaves off your plants! When you do this the plant will be able to send water and nutrients into new and healthy existing leaves!

Fertilize: A few times a year, interior plants need to be fed fertilizer — we like to do it once a month from March through August.

Research: When you buy a new plant, do a quick search and find out where it is native to! This will help you know how to create a good environment for it in your home. If it’s from a desert area, you can keep it in full sun with water just once a month, and if it’s from a tropical area then it will do better a few feet from the window with water about once a week.

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